Vehicle rams into motorcade carrying British, Belgian PMs, injures 2 police officers – reports

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                <figcaption>FILE PHOTO / <span class="copyright">Free</span></figcaption>
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                        <strong>A car crashed into a motorcade carrying the British and Belgian prime ministers, Theresa May and Charles Michel, as the two were travelling to a WWI commemorative event in Belgium. Two police officers were injured in the incident.</strong>

        The road accident occurred as May and Michel were going to the St. Symphorien War Cemetery located near the southwestern Belgian city of Mons, not far from the French border. The convoy carrying the two prime ministers was moving along the E19/E42 highway when a car rammed into it, hitting two police officers riding motorcycles, according to Sudinfo.
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        <figcaption>©  AFP/Gareth Fuller / <span class="copyright">Free</span></figcaption>
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The two officers were injured and taken to the hospital, according to local media. Michel was reportedly forced to stop the motorcade for some time, but the party then continued to their destination.

The details of the incident as well as the identity of the driver, who rammed his car in the convoy, have not been revealed.

© AFP/Gareth Fuller / Free

The reasons behind the incident are also still unknown. There have been no official statements from the authorities or law enforcement agencies so far.

After the motorcade resumed its journey, May and Michel visited the St. Symphorien cemetery, where they took part in a wreath-laying ceremony as part of the commemorative events marking the centenary of the end of WWI. The two prime ministers laid wreaths made of white roses and poppies on the graves of the first and last British soldiers killed in the war.

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